Archive for the ‘falsified prescriptions’ Category

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Do I have to purchase my glasses from my Optometrists?

I visited an optometrist yesterday and the optician that this optometrist is affiliated tries to sell me glasses. In fact it is quite expensive and I want to check the prices at other places too. Can I get my prescription from there and take it to somewhere else?

Another question, my eyes got 0.25 worse since my last exam but I want to purchase the same lenses that I am using now. Because, I just got bored of seeing my prescription eye numbers got worse and I feel I am happy with my current glasses. How should I tell my optometrist?
Thanks for the responses. I have some scratches on the lenses. I don’t need a frame but I need new lenses. That’s the main reason I went to a doctor.

You can get the prescription and have it filled anywhere you want. Be careful of those cut-rate chains, though. I had a problem with them and so have others. Tiny scratch in the center of both lenses from poor handling, center of lens not centered in front of the eye and more. There are independent places that do a good job for a reasonable price. But I see little reason to buy new glasses if you aren’t going to change the lenses and I doubt the optometrist would write you a falsified prescription. If all you want are new frames you might be able to get your old lenses trimmed down and reset.

Security Clearance for US Army Officer?

What is the security clearance process to become a US Army Officer?

What are they looking for?

What will they ask me (in general)?

Who will they contact about me?

The reason I ask is because I smoked marijuana a few times in high school. My recruiter told me just not to put it on the enlistment papers (I am enlisting into the reserves in 2 weeks and I will go to college then go back into Active as an Officer.)

I also know someone who is about to enlist a couple months after me with, for the most part, the same plan and same circumstances but he had sold prescription drugs to friends for a couple months. He was never convicted or charged with anything. Also, he was 16 when this happened. As was I when I experimented with Marijuana

Question is: What should he or I admit, and what should we just pretend never happened?
Also, what level of clearance is required for an infantry officer?

One of the first things they are looking for is Integrity. I can’t believe that a recruiter would tell you to falsify your application. You may want to reconsider who you talk to and find someone with a little more moral fiber.

Question about presumptive eligibility for medicaid?

I recently broke my tooth. I waived my insurance for confidentiality reasons to get medicaid. If I went to my dentist and used my previous insurance, would the medicaid show up anywhere when I try to get treatment at my dentist?

Presumptive Eligibility (PE) is a program that offers temporary coverage of prenatal care services to pregnant women while their Medicaid applications are pending. Do you fall in to that category?

Approval for Presumptive Eligibility (PE) IS NOT the same as being approved for Medicaid. Your PE coverage is only temporary while you submit a Medicaid application and your Medicaid application is pending. Do you qualify based on your total household income?

PE care includes doctor visits, tests, lab work, and other care for your pregnancy. It also may include coverage dental care and prescription drugs. So if you did not tell the state Medicaid agency "for confidentiality reasons" that you already have dental insurance you may be falsifying your application for Medicaid benefits. I will leave it to you to research the penalties for that.

why does my yahoo address get filtered out as spam?


As part of its continued commitment to protect consumers from unwanted junk e-mail, Yahoo! Inc. (Nasdaq:YHOO – News), a leading global Internet company, today announced the filing of a lawsuit against "East Coast Exotics Entertainment Group, Inc. and Epoth LLC" for unlawfully sending sexually-explicit bulk spam e-mail messages to Yahoo! Mail users. The lawsuit was filed in the U.S. District Court for the Northern District of California in San Jose, under the federal CAN-SPAM anti-spam law. In conjunction with Yahoo!’s lawsuit, members of the industry’s anti-spam alliance, including America Online, EarthLink and Microsoft also announced the filing of lawsuits against unlawful spammers.
"With today’s lawsuit against East Coast Exotics Entertainment Group, Inc. and Epoth LLC, we are holding spammers directly accountable for unlawfully disguising their identity and using this practice to deceive e-mail users," said Mike Callahan, senior vice president and general counsel, Yahoo! Inc. "Consumers trust Yahoo! to provide a safe and secure experience, which is why we take an aggressive, multi-faceted approach to protect e-mail users through legal efforts, industry collaboration and technological enhancements."

Allegations described in the complaint include direct violations of the CAN-SPAM law, as listed below. The full complaint can be found at: http://antispam.yahoo.com.

Sent sexually explicit material in the subject lines of e-mail messages
Disguised e-mail identity by including false designations of the originating e-mail addresses
Sent from e-mail accounts obtained for the express purpose of sending spam
Contained misleading header information to disguise the origin of the messages
Falsified the transmission path, using open proxies, to disguise the origin of the messages
Failed to provide a clear option to "opt-out" or unsubscribe from future e-mails
Failed to include the physical postal address of the sender in the messages
Failed to indicate that the spam messages were advertisements or solicitations
Violations were also filed under the Computer Fraud and Abuse Act, the California Computer Crime Statute and the civil conspiracy law.
Industry Efforts
This is the second round of junk e-mail-related enforcement actions filed by members of the anti-spam alliance, which was founded in April 2003 and is led by Yahoo!, Microsoft, EarthLink and AOL. On March 10, 2004, these companies collaborated to file the first major industry lawsuits against spammers alleging violations under the new CAN-SPAM federal law, which went into effect on January 1, 2004. CAN-SPAM provides strong enforcement tools and allows for harsh, new penalties against large-scale spammers who use tactics of fraud, deceit and evasion to spread their junk e-mail messages.

Information on the other Companies’ lawsuits filed today follows:

America Online: America Online filed two lawsuits in Federal Court – both naming numerous "John Does" as Defendants and alleging violations of Federal and State laws. One lawsuit is the very first to expressly target "SPIM" for AOL, and the most significant "spimmer" lawsuit ever filed in the industry, as it addresses instant messenger spam and chat room spam. The next lawsuit is the first AOL enforcement action against a spammer peddling controlled substances, including Vicodin and other pharmaceuticals, which are legally available only with a physician’s prescription.

EarthLink: EarthLink filed a lawsuit against numerous "John Doe" defendants who used illegal and deceptive e-mails to advertise prescription drugs available without a legitimate prescription and low mortgage or loan rates, in many cases attempting to collect and re-sell consumers’ names and contact information. EarthLink’s complaint charges the defendants with violating the CAN-SPAM Act along with other federal and state statutes.

Microsoft: Today’s three lawsuits filed by Microsoft allege that defendants spoofed the domains of all four Internet service providers and used open proxies to route the e-mails. The defendants – one named and two "John Does" – allegedly sent millions of e-mails soliciting herbal growth supplements, mortgage services and get-rich-quick schemes, all in violation of the CAN-SPAM federal law.

Additional details of all four companies’ lawsuits are available on their respective company press web sites.
On the technical side, these companies collaborated in June to present a host of detailed best practices and technical recommendations for the entire industry in an effort to fight the scourge of spam. Their proposals recommended actions and policies for the entire online industry – and primarily focused on two key issues: helping solve the e-mail forgery problem by eliminating domain spoofing through cryptographic-based solutions and Internet Protocol (IP)-based solutions; and best practices to help prevent ISPs and their customers from being sources of spam.

Difference between Amway protein 100% whey protein?

Difference between Amway protein power or 100% whey protein. Please help me witch is better one.

Thanks you for GOOD ANSWER.

It doesn’t matter because you don’t need and should not take either.

Read my answer about protein supplememts here –> http://answers.yahoo.com/question/index;_ylt=AtGdwn5cqfesP6O1LkavjSjty6IX;_ylv=3?qid=20110821092640AA3hq12

Read my answer about supplements here –> http://answers.yahoo.com/question/index;_ylt=AmA35VDViBrL0y9rSkKcLknty6IX;_ylv=3?qid=20111001134224AANB0OV

Quacks, charlatans, and people selling worthless medications to a hapless public have been around for thousands of years. Go here for more about chicanery in selling health products –> http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Quackery . Today, in the 21st century, the old "snake oil" salesman has been replaced by supplement sellers. They prey on the young, the naive, the credulous, and the ignorant by offering males the promise of big muscles and ripped bodies and females the hope of fast and easy fat loss, sexy abs, and bikini bodies. The fact that none of these products do what they are advertised to do does not stop the public from spending $billions on them annually in the US alone. The products are everywhere from drug store shelves to super markets to nutrition centers and health food stores. And, in the past 15 years, the internet has become the new way to peddle this junk to young minds full of impossible dreams and all sold under the banner of SUPPLEMENTS.

In 1994 the US Congress, under pressure from supplement maker lobbying, passed the DSHEA which allowed questionable supplements to be sold with NO TESTING. The "no testing" proviso allows any supplement maker to sell anything because without testing there is no way to determine what is actually being sold much less if it is safe or even if it works. The result has been the internet has become dominated by thousands of web sites selling worthless products under generic names such as "fat burners". "bulking formulas". "cutting formulas", "pre-workout drinks", "post-workout mass gainers", "intra-workout formulas", "weight gainers", "N.O. rippers", and on and on. It’s the 21st century "snake oil" and the suckers are spending over $20 billion on them annually in the US.

For more about the DSHEA go here –> http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Dietary_supplement#Examples_of_Dietary_Supplements
Here’s an excerpt:"The law has left consumers without the protections surrounding the manufacture and marketing of over-the-counter or prescription medications and it became the FDA’s responsibility to prove that a supplement wasn’t safe. While pharmaceutical manufacturers must demonstrate their products are effective as well as being safe, supplement manufacturers are not required to demonstrate efficacy."

Supplement scammers build web sites for everything so they will always be at the top of your search results and super easy to find. The use fake reviews, testimonials, news reports, technical articles, YouTube videos, science papers, and more all full of lies just to get your money. For them the internet is dirt cheap advertising that can reach the whole world and they can and do lie, lie, and lie because there is no incentive to tell the truth on the internet. They can falsify their claims and tell you anything without fear of repercussions. So, unless you want to fall victim to scammers, the burden is on you to separate the truth from fiction.

The scammers are experts at seducing the young and the clueless with cool sounding product names like "QuickFast EZ Loss Formula" or "Massabolic Supergainer Extreme XXX". They intrigue you will great graphics of hot babes and big ripped dudes. They are so predictable that you can just look at a supplement website and know it’s a scam. Check out http://www.bodybuilding.com/ and you’ll see a good example of a scam site that pretends to be experts on bodybuilding but in reality is just a front for supplement sales. They can’t make any money telling you about how to build your body the right way because you don’t need anything but food and determination to do that. So, they use the pretense of being the "go to" website for bodybuilding to make a fortune from supplements sales. Here’s proof of their scamming –> http://www.fda.gov/Safety/MedWatch/SafetyInformation/SafetyAlertsforHumanMedicalProducts/ucm188957.htm

Here’s another scam site –> http://www.wemarket4u.net/fatfoe/index.html but it’s a good one. Click the "Submit Answers" button and you’ll see what I mean.

So, now that you know how scammers work, it’s your choice. You can be smart or you can be just another sucker pouring money into the pockets of quacks.

Good luck and good health!!

Will whey protein that has creatine monohydrate….?

…help me gain another 5 or so pounds of water, or will that extra weight just be water because of the creatine? I’m a martial artist and I don’t want any extra water weight slowing me down. I’m speedy, but I don’t want to lose that speed and explosiveness.
Thanks much ClickMaster.
I read through all your links. You get best answer.

You don’t need whey and you probably don’t know what you’re getting when you buy it. Same for creatine. So, if you stop using it, you won’t have to worry about weight. If you really gave a damn about your weight you wouldn’t be taking protein because it has the same caloric value as pure sugar.

Read my answer about protein supplememts here –> http://answers.yahoo.com/question/index;_ylt=AtGdwn5cqfesP6O1LkavjSjty6IX;_ylv=3?qid=20110821092640AA3hq12

Read my answer about supplements here –> http://answers.yahoo.com/question/index;_ylt=AmA35VDViBrL0y9rSkKcLknty6IX;_ylv=3?qid=20111001134224AANB0OV

Quacks, charlatans, and people selling worthless medications to a hapless public have been around for thousands of years. Go here for more about chicanery in selling health products –> http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Quackery . Today, in the 21st century, the old "snake oil" salesman has been replaced by supplement sellers. They prey on the young, the naive, the credulous, and the ignorant by offering males the promise of big muscles and ripped bodies and females the hope of fast and easy fat loss, sexy abs, and bikini bodies. The fact that none of these products do what they are advertised to do does not stop the public from spending $billions on them annually in the US alone. The products are everywhere from drug store shelves to super markets to nutrition centers and health food stores. And, in the past 15 years, the internet has become the new way to peddle this junk to young minds full of impossible dreams and all sold under the banner of SUPPLEMENTS.

In 1994 the US Congress, under pressure from supplement maker lobbying, passed the DSHEA which allowed questionable supplements to be sold with NO TESTING. The "no testing" proviso allows any supplement maker to sell anything because without testing there is no way to determine what is actually being sold much less if it is safe or even if it works. The result has been the internet has become dominated by thousands of web sites selling worthless products under generic names such as "fat burners". "bulking formulas". "cutting formulas", "pre-workout drinks", "post-workout mass gainers", "intra-workout formulas", "weight gainers", "N.O. rippers", and on and on. It’s the 21st century "snake oil" and the suckers are spending over $20 billion on them annually in the US.

For more about the DSHEA go here –> http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Dietary_supplement#Examples_of_Dietary_Supplements
Here’s an excerpt:"The law has left consumers without the protections surrounding the manufacture and marketing of over-the-counter or prescription medications and it became the FDA’s responsibility to prove that a supplement wasn’t safe. While pharmaceutical manufacturers must demonstrate their products are effective as well as being safe, supplement manufacturers are not required to demonstrate efficacy."

Supplement scammers build web sites for everything so they will always be at the top of your search results and super easy to find. The use fake reviews, testimonials, news reports, technical articles, YouTube videos, science papers, and more all full of lies just to get your money. For them the internet is dirt cheap advertising that can reach the whole world and they can and do lie, lie, and lie because there is no incentive to tell the truth on the internet. They can falsify their claims and tell you anything without fear of repercussions. So, unless you want to fall victim to scammers, the burden is on you to separate the truth from fiction.

The scammers are experts at seducing the young and the clueless with cool sounding product names like "QuickFast EZ Loss Formula" or "Massabolic Supergainer Extreme XXX". They intrigue you will great graphics of hot babes and big ripped dudes. They are so predictable that you can just look at a supplement website and know it’s a scam. Check out http://www.bodybuilding.com/ and you’ll see a good example of a scam site that pretends to be experts on bodybuilding but in reality is just a front for supplement sales. They can’t make any money telling you about how to build your body the right way because you don’t need anything but food and determination to do that. So, they use the pretense of being the "go to" website for bodybuilding to make a fortune from supplements sales. Here’s proof of their scamming –> http://www.fda.gov/Safety/MedWatch/SafetyInformation/SafetyAlertsforHumanMedicalProducts/ucm188957.htm

Here’s another scam site –> http://www.wemarket4u.net/fatfoe/index.html but it’s a good one. Click the "Submit Answers" button and you’ll see what I mean.

So, now that you know how scammers work, it’s your choice. You can be smart or you can be just another sucker pouring money into the pockets of quacks.

Good luck and good health!!

Do you think that George Bush will appoint Mark Foley to a cabinet level position.?

Maybe he could replace Rummy, he is on the way out.

Why not promote Mark Foley (arrested for soliciting teenagers)? Look at how many ethical republican party members there are (and this isn’t even half the list!):

Jack Abramoff (arrested for giving bribes)
Randy “Duke” Cunningham (plead guilty to conspiracy and tax charges, taking $2.4 million in bribes)
Bob Ney (plead guilty to conspiracy and making false statements)
George Ryan (conviction on corruption charges)
Tom Delay (arrested for taking bribes)
Ralph Reed (arrested for taking bribes)
Claude Allen (plead guilty to shoplifting)
Pat Robertson (uncharged, advocated murder against Hugo Chavez)
Ann Coulter (uncharged, admitted to terrorist act against NY Times)
Brian J. Doyle Homeland Security Official (arrested for soliciting a 14y.o. girl)
Rush Limbaugh (arrested for falsifying prescriptions)
O’Reilly (sued for sexual harassment)
George Allen (used racist and anti-semetic slurs)
Larry Dale Floyd (arrested on suspicion of trying to rape an 8y.o. girl)
Judge Mark Pazuhanich (pleaded no contest to fondling 10y.o. girl)
Bobby Stumbo (arrested for raping a 5y.o. boy)
Mayor Philip Giordano (37 year sentence; sexual abuse of 8 and 10y.o. girls)
Republican Mayor John Gosek (arrested for trying to rape two 15y.o. girls)
David Swartz (plead guilty to sexually molesting two girls under age 11)
Edison Misla Aldarondo (sentenced to 10 years, raped his daughter from age 9 to 17)
John R. Curtain (molested a teenage boy, unlawful sexual contact with a minor)
Anti-abortionist Howard Scott Heldreth (convicted child rapist in Florida)
Anti-abortionist Nicholas Morency (plead guilty to possessing child pornography, on his computer and offering a bounty to anybody who murders an abortion doctor)
Tom Shortridge (sentenced to 3 years for taking nude photographs of 15y.o. girl)
Strom Thurmond (raped a 15y.o. black girl which produced a child)
Mike Hintz (admitting to raping a female juvenile)
Peter Dibble (plead no contest to inappropriate relationship with 13y.o. girl)
Carey Lee Cramer (sexually molested 9y.o. step-daughter)
Craig J. Spence (organized child rape parties at the White House during the 1980s)
Richard A. Delgaudio (guilty of child porn charges, paying girls for sexual photos)
Mark A. Grethen (convicted on six counts of sex crimes involving children)
Randal David Ankeney (plead guilty to attempted sexual assault on a child)
Dan Crane (raped a female minor working as a congressional page)
Beverly Russell (admitted to an incestuous relationship with his step daughter)
Judge Ronald C. Kline (under house arrest for child molesting and child porn)
Anti-gay activist Robert Bauman (charged with raping a 16y.o.)
Jeffrey Patti (arrested for distributing a video of 5y.o. girl being raped)
Jim West (abused boys in 1970s, misuse of office)
Merrill Robert Barter (plead guilty to unlawful sexual contact and assault on a teenage boy)
Parker J. Bena (pleaded guilty to possession of child pornography)
Howard L. Brooks (accused of molesting 12y.o.)
Andrew Buhr (charged with two counts of rape of 13y.o. boy)
John Allen Burt, anti-abortionist (sexually molested 15y.o. girl at the home for troubled girls that he ran)
Keola Childs (plead guilty to sexual assault on a male child)
Kevin Coan (arrested for trying to rape a 14y.o. girl)
Richard A Dasen, Sr. (convicted of sexual abuse of children, promotion of prostitution and several counts of solicitation)
Nicholas Elizondo, Director of the Young Republicans Federation (molested his 6-year old daughter)
Jack W. Gardner (convicted of molesting a 13-year old girl)
Richard Gardner (molesting his two daughters)
Jon Grunseth (alleged to have swum in the nude with underage girls, including his daughter)
Paul Ingram (plead guilty to six counts of raping his daughters)
Lawrence E. King, Jr. (organized rape orgies with child prostitutes at the White House during the 1980s)
I. Lewis "Scooter" Libby (author of beastiality and pedophillia fiction)
Donald Lukens (guilty of raping a minor, sex with her from age 13)
Harvey Pitt (distributed teen sex videos)
Fred C. Smeltzer, Jr. (plead no contest to raping a 15y.o. girl)
Robin Vanderwall (convicted of five counts of soliciting sex from boys and girls over the internet)
Stephen White (arrested for offering to pay $20 to a 14y.o. boy to perform oral sex on him)
Steve Aiken (convicted in 1995 of sexual relations with a teenager)

You can also add in the sick puppies from this site:

http://demopedia.democraticunderground.com/index.php/Republican_Values

.

Who watches One Tree Hill?

I missed last nights episode, and I wanted to know if it was new or not and what i did or didn’t miss

Um…i watched the episode. Hmm….nothing too significant happened though. Peyton is haunted by memories of her ‘brother’ and she can’t go back to school because of that. Neyton still has his money problems. Deb tries to buy her pills with a falsified prescription and gets caught. Then Dan tells her he will help her out of jail, if she signs Trick back to Karen. Deb agrees to this offer. Brooke finds out that her teacher has an affair with an other girl and she breaks up with him.

Well, I guess that’s pretty much everything. Hope I’ve been helpful

does protein shake bad if your 15?

i drink a muscle building milk shake and i notice it says not intended for persons under 18 does this affects me in any way

Ask your self why you want protein shakes and you’ll find it because you just do. You’ve been brainwashed by gym talk, myths, rumors, advertising, and other bad information. However, you will NOT find any good science suggesting they will benefit you unless you have a horrible diet. And, if you have a bad diet, fix the diet. Eat food.

Read my answer about protein supplements here –> http://answers.yahoo.com/question/index;_ylt=AtGdwn5cqfesP6O1LkavjSjty6IX;_ylv=3?qid=20110821092640AA3hq12

Read my answer about supplements here –> http://answers.yahoo.com/question/index;_ylt=AmA35VDViBrL0y9rSkKcLknty6IX;_ylv=3?qid=20111001134224AANB0OV

You’re about to be scammed.

Quacks, charlatans, and people selling worthless medications to a hapless public have been around for thousands of years. Go here for more about chicanery in selling health products –> http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Quackery . Today, in the 21st century, the old "snake oil" salesman has been replaced by supplement sellers. They prey on the young, the naive, the credulous, and the ignorant by offering males the promise of big muscles and ripped bodies and females the hope of fast and easy fat loss, sexy abs, and bikini bodies. The fact that none of these products do what they are advertised to do does not stop the public from spending $billions on them annually in the US alone. The products are everywhere from drug store shelves to super markets to nutrition centers and health food stores. And, in the past 15 years, the internet has become the new way to peddle this junk to young minds full of impossible dreams and all sold under the banner of SUPPLEMENTS.

In 1994 the US Congress, under pressure from supplement maker lobbying, passed the DSHEA which allowed questionable supplements to be sold with NO TESTING. The "no testing" proviso allows any supplement maker to sell anything because without testing there is no way to determine what is actually being sold much less if it is safe or even if it works. The result has been the internet has become dominated by thousands of web sites selling worthless products under generic names such as "fat burners". "bulking formulas". "cutting formulas", "pre-workout drinks", "post-workout mass gainers", "intra-workout formulas", "weight gainers", "N.O. rippers", and on and on. It’s the 21st century "snake oil" and the suckers are spending over $20 billion on them annually in the US.

For more about the DSHEA go here –> http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Dietary_supplement#Examples_of_Dietary_Supplements
Here’s an excerpt:"The law has left consumers without the protections surrounding the manufacture and marketing of over-the-counter or prescription medications and it became the FDA’s responsibility to prove that a supplement wasn’t safe. While pharmaceutical manufacturers must demonstrate their products are effective as well as being safe, supplement manufacturers are not required to demonstrate efficacy."

Supplement scammers build web sites for everything so they will always be at the top of your search results and super easy to find. The use fake reviews, testimonials, news reports, technical articles, YouTube videos, science papers, and more all full of lies just to get your money. For them the internet is dirt cheap advertising that can reach the whole world and they can and do lie, lie, and lie because there is no incentive to tell the truth on the internet. They can falsify their claims and tell you anything without fear of repercussions. So, unless you want to fall victim to scammers, the burden is on you to separate the truth from fiction.

The scammers are experts at seducing the young and the clueless with cool sounding product names like "QuickFast EZ Loss Formula" or "Massabolic Supergainer Extreme XXX". They intrigue you will great graphics of hot babes and big ripped dudes. They are so predictable that you can just look at a supplement website and know it’s a scam. Check out http://www.bodybuilding.com/ and you’ll see a good example of a scam site that pretends to be experts on bodybuilding but in reality is just a front for supplement sales. They can’t make any money telling you about how to build your body the right way because you don’t need anything but food and determination to do that. So, they use the pretense of being the "go to" website for bodybuilding to make a fortune from supplements sales. Here’s proof of their scamming –> http://www.fda.gov/Safety/MedWatch/SafetyInformation/SafetyAlertsforHumanMedicalProducts/ucm188957.htm

Here’s another scam site –> http://www.wemarket4u.net/fatfoe/index.html but it’s a good one. Click the "Submit Answers" button and you’ll see what I mean.

So, now that you know how scammers work, it’s your choice. You can be smart or you can be just another sucker pouring money into the pockets of quacks.

Good luck and good health!!