Does a drug overdose or addiction remedy exist called hybercaine?

I saw it in an episode of Law & Order & I think the guy said it was hybercaine but I can’t be sure…Also I saw a similarly used antidote in a movie called Harvard Man which was used to cure his overdose on LSD…

It’s called ibogaine, along with it’s most closely related analogue noribogaine. The experience is often breathtaking, much like more common psychedelic substances (LSD, magic mushrooms, mescaline, etc.), which is a factor in the chemical’s ability to help detox many stimulant, opiate, and depressant users. The primary factor is the fact that ibogaine commonly lasts at the very least twelves hours, though it can up to a couple days much longer. During the experience (which consists of a hallucinogenic state in the first four hours followed by a drawn-out cinematographic and deep recollection of the events in ones life), ibogaine / noribogaine and other psychedelics do an easy task of clouding much of the somatic withdrawal effects that comes with detoxing, as well as allowing one’s own personal biases and inhibitions to whisk away to see the world with a new and more evolved perspective (many psychedelics would do as good of a job of curing addiction as ibogaine if they lasted as long).

The show doesn’t make sense. First, it takes inordinate amounts of LSD to overdose (7500 typical doses). Secondly, LSD and ibogaine are both psychedelic hallucinogens. Their effects are more or less in the same range (although ibogaine does contain a certain dissociative haze that overlays the experience). The ibogaine might have been used to calm down a person having a "bad trip (which is essentially controlled by propaganda)" by clouding their sense of reality, but it seems like a pretty ineffective way to do that.

One Response to “Does a drug overdose or addiction remedy exist called hybercaine?”

  • Echo says:

    It’s called ibogaine, along with it’s most closely related analogue noribogaine. The experience is often breathtaking, much like more common psychedelic substances (LSD, magic mushrooms, mescaline, etc.), which is a factor in the chemical’s ability to help detox many stimulant, opiate, and depressant users. The primary factor is the fact that ibogaine commonly lasts at the very least twelves hours, though it can up to a couple days much longer. During the experience (which consists of a hallucinogenic state in the first four hours followed by a drawn-out cinematographic and deep recollection of the events in ones life), ibogaine / noribogaine and other psychedelics do an easy task of clouding much of the somatic withdrawal effects that comes with detoxing, as well as allowing one’s own personal biases and inhibitions to whisk away to see the world with a new and more evolved perspective (many psychedelics would do as good of a job of curing addiction as ibogaine if they lasted as long).

    The show doesn’t make sense. First, it takes inordinate amounts of LSD to overdose (7500 typical doses). Secondly, LSD and ibogaine are both psychedelic hallucinogens. Their effects are more or less in the same range (although ibogaine does contain a certain dissociative haze that overlays the experience). The ibogaine might have been used to calm down a person having a "bad trip (which is essentially controlled by propaganda)" by clouding their sense of reality, but it seems like a pretty ineffective way to do that.
    References :
    Experience and over 25 months of research.

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