What is the difference between a DUI and a DWI?

I am mainly interested in the DUI/DWI definition in relevance to alcohol.
I know DUI is Driving Under the Influence
and
DWI is "Driving While Intoxicated, but what is the difference between the two?
What exactly do they mean whenever they say "under the influence?"
Does it mean driving with alcohol in the car (or open), or does it mean having a drunk person in the car with you? Maybe a difference in the alcohol content?

By the way, I live in Missouri, so please include any differences with DUI and DWI in my state, thanks!

In-toxicated – while poisoned… while with a Toxic sibstance.
and Alcohol is a poison.

logically, it refers to Alcohol only. (or another poison)

while DUI,
can be that AND/OR something else (that prevents you driving well).

7 Responses to “What is the difference between a DUI and a DWI?”

  • HyperDog says:

    There’s no difference.
    References :

  • u_bin_called says:

    It varies by state.

    In many cases "DUI" and "DWI" are synonymous. Some states, however, allow drivers to be charged for "impaired" driving even if not over the state-mandated blood alcohol level. Thus, you could be charged with "DUI" even if you were not legally "intoxicated."
    References :

  • Tyler says:

    DWI Driving while intoxicated: This means drink driving (alcohol)

    DUI Driving under the influence: This means under the influence of some sort of narcotic or prohibited substance such a marijuana.
    References :

  • hotwheels122287 says:

    DUI means you can be pulled over for any reason that you are under the influence of

    drugs
    alcohol
    lack of sleep
    etc.

    DWI i BELIEVE solely refers to alcohol.
    References :

  • A Turd Sandwich says:

    A lot of people will give you the explanation that DWI – Driving While Intoxicated – was considered to only refer to alcohol whereas DUI – Driving Under the Influence – encompasses drugs as well as alcohol. This may have some sort of truth in some states but it’s not really a fair answer.

    For the most part, the two are interchangeable terms. They’re different names for the same thing, and every state’s laws read differently. Some states call it a DWI, others call it a DUI, and others use terms like OUI or OWI – Operating Under the Influence or Operating While Intoxicated, respectively. Some states have special classifications such as DUID: Driving Under the Influence – Drugs, DWID, OWID, etc…

    Missouri appears to have two things: DWI for alcohol, and DUID for drugs. Again, every state is different but the terms are really interchangeable. The state’s laws say DWI but a judge or anyone else may refer to it in passing as DUI and it means the same thing.

    To answer your other question, having alcohol in the car does NOT constitute a DUI/DWI, nor does having a "drunk" person in the car with you. Having an open container of alcohol in the car is illegal in MOST state (a few have exceptions that actually allow it), but it is not a DUI just a violation of an open container law.

    DUI/DWI/OWI/DUID/etc. occurs when a person who is under the influence – either of drugs or with a BAC of .08% or above, is "operating" a motor vehicle. This is another area where state laws differ. In some states, you can be charged with DUI for as little as sitting in the driver’s seat of a car while under the influence because you are considered to be in physical control of it. Other states require the keys to be in the ignition, and others require the engine to be on. On the other hand, there are some states where you actually have to be driving the car and it is completely legal to be sitting in the driver’s seat with the keys in the ignition while under the influence as long as you’re not putting it in gear.
    References :

  • NeilSherman says:

    DUI and DWI and OWI and bunches more are describing the same thing; it’s simply being physically unfit to operate machinery. "why" you’re unfit and "how" you’re unfit don’t matter, only thing that matters is "that" you’re unfit. Why they can’t simply say "unfit for operating machinery" and they just have to dramatize everything into Techno-Boogedy-Man Razzmatazz is a matter of pompous vanity on the part of the narcissists that write the words on paper and perform the cauldron sacrificial rituals that imbue the life into the talismans the incantations are expressed for.

    "What exactly do they mean whenever they say "under the influence?""
    They mean the time it takes for you to recognize something your eyes see or your ears hear is delayed longer than necessary for you to perform maneuvers properly; be that influence distracting pain, insufficient electrolyte balance, euphorics, or anything else.

    "Does it mean driving with alcohol in the car (or open),"
    No. While transport of commercial goods is covered by statutory codes covering means of containment, proper packaging and necessary labeling, violations of which are chargeable offenses, those offenses are separate issues from an operator’s physical acuity to perform functions properly.

    "does it mean having a drunk person in the car with you?"
    No. While an operator is required to maintain control of all passengers in their trust, and failure to do so is a chargeable offense, and while such passengers are, themselves, required to avoid interfering with an operator’s functions, which failure do so is also a chargeable offense, neither of the activities are influential to the isolated issue of an operator’s Fitness to function properly.

    "Maybe a difference in the alcohol content?"
    Yes. The alcohol content is directly relational to the issue of maintaining the electrolyte balance necessary for an operator’s proper neuro-motor functions.

    "no matter Where you go, there _You_ are".
    References :

  • Andi says:

    In-toxicated – while poisoned… while with a Toxic sibstance.
    and Alcohol is a poison.

    logically, it refers to Alcohol only. (or another poison)

    while DUI,
    can be that AND/OR something else (that prevents you driving well).
    References :

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