What do I have to say to my doctor to prescribe me Xanax?

First of all, I have a legitimate anxiety condition, and suffer from panic attacks. I have been given all sorts of medication, like Zoloft, Prozac, Atarax, and Ativan. None of them worked for me. I’m more of a yoga/meditation type of person, but the anxiety has overpowered everything I’ve tried. I even have relaxation apps on my iPhone. I exercise daily, and that isn’t working either.

A friend gave me Xanax once, and it really helped with my chest pain and gave me the relief I needed. I really like that it’s not a pill you have to take all the time.

But, when I ask a doctor about giving me a prescription, they look at me like they just saw a ghost. Apparently, it’s very addicting and they don’t like prescribing it. I guess people also abuse them, or something like that.

What angers me the most about this is that I know perfectly healthy teenagers and adults that fake their symptoms just to get it, and here I am, getting the runaround.

I’m frustrated and don’t know what to do. Am I going to have to have a panic attack in front of doctors to get this stuff? I’m going to the psychiatrist next week, so hopefully they’ll understand my frustrations. Anyone else have a similar experience?

A word of advice… never go in to a doctor’s office and name a known addictive and often abused drug, and then say you want it. If you’d just told them your symptoms, you’d have had a better chance of having it prescribed. A major warning sign of a drug seeker is someone coming in requesting a specific controlled substance, and the second best warning sign is a doctor-hopper (going to multiple doctors asking for the same thing until someone says yes).

Just talk to the psychiatrist and tell them what you’ve tried, that it didn’t work and outline your symptoms as they are when asked. If they think Xanax is appropriate, you will be offered it with the appropriate warnings, etc. Telling them that you took a controlled substance from someone else (i.e. you had no prescription) is also a bit dodgy… no one wants to prescribe that sort of thing and then have people sharing it out to friends. Not a good look. So, just tell them how you’re feeling and what you’ve tried with your lifestyle and on prescription, and leave the choice of drug to the professional. You will be more likely to end up with Xanax that way as you won’t be ringing warning bells through your whole interview. Remember too that Cognitive Behavioural Therapy has the best long term outcomes anyways.

3 Responses to “What do I have to say to my doctor to prescribe me Xanax?”

  • Fustercluck says:

    He/she should know your symptoms. Ask if the drug might help
    References :

  • Doktor Evil says:

    Try a different doctor. Some doctors have their preffered meds.
    References :

  • Laaz says:

    A word of advice… never go in to a doctor’s office and name a known addictive and often abused drug, and then say you want it. If you’d just told them your symptoms, you’d have had a better chance of having it prescribed. A major warning sign of a drug seeker is someone coming in requesting a specific controlled substance, and the second best warning sign is a doctor-hopper (going to multiple doctors asking for the same thing until someone says yes).

    Just talk to the psychiatrist and tell them what you’ve tried, that it didn’t work and outline your symptoms as they are when asked. If they think Xanax is appropriate, you will be offered it with the appropriate warnings, etc. Telling them that you took a controlled substance from someone else (i.e. you had no prescription) is also a bit dodgy… no one wants to prescribe that sort of thing and then have people sharing it out to friends. Not a good look. So, just tell them how you’re feeling and what you’ve tried with your lifestyle and on prescription, and leave the choice of drug to the professional. You will be more likely to end up with Xanax that way as you won’t be ringing warning bells through your whole interview. Remember too that Cognitive Behavioural Therapy has the best long term outcomes anyways.
    References :
    Doctor

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