Chavez is being preserved in perpetuity, do you think he rates such?

Others who have been so preseved are V. I. Lenin, Simon Bolivar, Mao .Am I the only one that thinks these three examples far outstrip Hugo Chavez in stature? What do you think?

Every country views their luminaries in ways that generally serves whoever follows on from them. For example, China’s multiple-personality disorder during the 20th century illustrates their leaders aping the past and subsequently branding it a huge mistake.

With regards Chavez i’ve heard completely contrasting opinions over the past few days. To any objective observer it’s clear that he was a hugely divisive figure: you could point out his provisions for the poor or you could point out his cronyism. Does he deserve to be immortalised? Short answer: no. But his right-hand man is to many the next President in all but name. And he and his cronies have a lot to gain by lionizing Chavez and seeking to perpetuate his legacy.

Having said that it’s difficult for people from Western countries to grasp how much of a towering figure Chavez was in Venezuela. There are few leaders in the world today who ostensibly champion the poor and needy as he sought to do. A period of extended mourning is therefore understandable, and i hope that a more sober evaluation of his achievements comes to light in the near future.

6 Responses to “Chavez is being preserved in perpetuity, do you think he rates such?”

  • C L S says:

    No certainly not.
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  • DASHA says:

    i dont care whether they preserve his body or not he will still ROT IN HELL
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  • born at freedmans says:

    What I think of Chavez is insignificant. His people and their sentiments are all that matters.
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  • charlessmith702210@sbcglobal.net says:

    Well, he may not be as revered in socialist circles as the infamous Juan Peron of Argentina, but Chavez is a bit like Juan Peron.
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  • Sssssssss says:

    He probably killed a lot of potential drug dealers. Yes. Hugo does.
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  • Sammy Jankis says:

    Every country views their luminaries in ways that generally serves whoever follows on from them. For example, China’s multiple-personality disorder during the 20th century illustrates their leaders aping the past and subsequently branding it a huge mistake.

    With regards Chavez i’ve heard completely contrasting opinions over the past few days. To any objective observer it’s clear that he was a hugely divisive figure: you could point out his provisions for the poor or you could point out his cronyism. Does he deserve to be immortalised? Short answer: no. But his right-hand man is to many the next President in all but name. And he and his cronies have a lot to gain by lionizing Chavez and seeking to perpetuate his legacy.

    Having said that it’s difficult for people from Western countries to grasp how much of a towering figure Chavez was in Venezuela. There are few leaders in the world today who ostensibly champion the poor and needy as he sought to do. A period of extended mourning is therefore understandable, and i hope that a more sober evaluation of his achievements comes to light in the near future.
    References :

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